Fun And Games · Pains in my Fifth Point of Contact

BEFORE GOOGLE

Gather ’round, my children, and listen to a tale of long ago, and far away! In those far away, long ago times, there was electricity, yes, and telephones as well (although they were anchored to the walls of our homes, by “wires”). Why, indeed, we even had the Goddam Noisy Box, which you young ‘uns call “TV”.

Once upon a time, I was volunteering at a free clinic, serving as a nurse therein. The volunteer physician would interview, and examine the patient, and then provide orders for the treatment indicated. In those days, should one have symptoms of gonorrhea, the therapy was two injections of procaine penicillin g.

This turned out to be around 3 cc each, of a very, very viscous fluid, made particularly slow flowing because it was kept in the refrigerator.

At this point, I had been an RN for several years, working full time in ER. I had administered many, many, many injections intramuscularly as well as intravenously. I was familiar with injections, as well as strategies to mitigate patient discomfort while they were administered.

So, one gentleman was diagnosed with gonorrhea, and I received an order to administer two injections of 2.4 million units, each, of procaine penicillin g. I secured the medication, verified it’s outdate as well as the order, and made sure that the other medications the patient took, as well as his allergies, did not contraindicate this treatment.

I entered the room, and checked that the patient had been told of our plan of care. His reply? “Doc, doc, just shoot it on in!”

I informed him that he did NOT want me to “just shoot it on in”, and he would very much not enjoy the result of my doing so.

He reiterated his demand. I told him,” Sir? You are going to get two of these shots. You do not want me to simply ‘shoot it on in” because you will find it to be way, way more uncomfortable than it needs to be.”

Unmoved, he repeated his demand.

“Sir, how about I do as you insist, for the first injection. Then we can talk, and see if you would like to try it my way for your second shot, okay?”

He stated that he would not change his mind. I injected the first syringe of medication, rapidly, as he had insisted. It took some effort, because the penicillin was very thick, and did not want to flow through the needle at all rapidly.

My patient was very, very impressed by his first injection. Not at all favorably.

He stood up, once I had removed the needle, and commenced to hopping around and swearing. “Goddam! That really, really hurt! Shit, shit, shit! Doc, let me cool myself for a while!”

I corrected him. “Sir, I am an RN, not a physician. Once you calm yourself, you have another injection coming. Why don’t you allow me to administer it in the way that I know I ought to, and you can tell me how it is compared to the first one?”

He soon calmed himself, and I administered the second injection, steadily and slowly. The advantage of doing so correctly, oddly enough, is that the deliberate pace of administration allows the medication to spread out, rather than remaining a single, irritating ball of foreign material in the muscle, eliciting a cramp and muscle spasm. A cramp about which my patient had testified loudly.

Once I was done with the second injection, he stood, adjusted his clothing, and rubbed the second injection site. “Ya know, doc, that second one was not anywhere near as painful as the first one!”

Gooll-llee, Sergeant Carter! Just as if I had gone to school for this stuff, or something!

3 thoughts on “BEFORE GOOGLE

  1. Mine was Gamma globulin (sp?) prior to Desert Storm. The guy in front of me was in a hurry and didn’t want to wait for the medic to warm it up after taking a new vial from the refrigerator. After watching his activity after his shot, I told the medic to take her time and do whatever she felt was best. I still felt like she injected a softball into my hip, but at least I didn’t have to hop away from the station on one leg like he did.

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