Fun And Games · Gratitude · Life in Da City! · Pains in my Fifth Point of Contact

Random Thoughts Part VI

Assessment of the elderly, sounding confused.

When I am assessing a patient, and ask, in my interview, ref location/day of month/day of week/name/etcetera, when you are not the patient, and YOU answer, talking over the patient, please realize that IDGAF about YOUR mentation, and when you coach the patient, it really, really interferes with my assessment. Plus, it is entirely likely that I myself KNOW the place/day/date/season/etcetera, because, you can bet your ass that if it were NOT Tuesday March the 41st, I would certainly be somewhere else, doing something else, other than attempting to struggle my way through your interruptions of my evaluation of your parent.

In a similar vein, when I ask Jim-Bob where he hurts, probably, when you coach Jim-Bob, admonishing him to “Tell the doctor where you hurt”, you are not really contributing any value whatsoever to the interview. If Jim-Bob indeed comprehends my question, you are only adding noise and distraction and likely, that is NOT helpful. If, on the other hand, Jim-Bob does not understand my query, your repeating it IN THE VERY SAME FREAKING WORDS, neither adds to the information that I require, so that I may care for Jim-Bob properly, nor facilitates timely implementation of that care. So, unless Jim-Bob does NOT speak Engrish, himself, please STFU, and allow me to interview the patient. Or, perhaps, go boil some water, gather a fresh newspaper and some clean shoelaces, right now, please.

Which will, of course, require you depart the exam room and allow me to complete my interview and examination.

Thank you.

Thoughts about Cost vs Price:

Lowe’s “bargain bin” AA battery powered cell phone charger: $10

Having several in your Bag-O’-Tricks at work, so you can hand one to a patient you’re sending to ED via ambulance, whose phone is dead: Kharma.

Having that guy get my cheap-o, bought-on-a-whim charger back to me, with a thank you: PRICELESS!

EMS LAW OF ALTITUDE: Patient’s weight divided by number of floors above street level equals a constant, “K”. Therefore, a 300 pound inert patient on the first floor is roughly equivalent to a 1200 pound patient on the 4th floor. With no functional elevator. And the first due engine company out on a working fire.

(redacted)’s Law: (I don’t have permission to use his name, but it’s not *MY* formulation) When responding to an EMS call, and you are pretty sure that you are on the correct block, but, for some reason, folks in this neighborhood do NOT have any house numbers, seek out the most tumbledown anonymous house on that block, and knock, Your patient awaits inside.

(redacted’s partner)’s Corollary Number One: The one house on the block with ghetto gates (bars on the doors and windows), is your call.

Corollary Number Two: Occupants of the house with the gates KNOW who is performing all the neighborhood B & Es.

Corollary Number Three: There is nothing inside the grilled house worth stealing. The decor is milk crates, cast offs, soiled mattresses on the floor. Even odds that the smell makes the place a haz mat scene.

Final Thought”

Please, please, please! If your physician has ALREADY prescribed a medication for your affliction, take the freaking med, BEFORE your come to my clinic stating that you require treatment for that selfsame affliction! Because, it could happen that my self control may lapse, and I may, indeed, ask you just how exactly I may help you, when you not only were prescribed, but physically picked up, the very medication that I would have prescribed (and, indeed, wound up prescribing) for your problem.

But, OF COURSE, you weren’t here to get a work note! Totally!

Duty · Fun And Games · Having A Good Partner Is Very Important! · Life in Da City! · Pains in my Fifth Point of Contact

Vehicular Extrication

Long ago and far away, I spent my salad days as a street medic in Da City’s EMS. I know, right? Startlement abounds, amirite? Anyhow, this one time, we caught a run. We arrived to find an intoxicated gentleman seated in the rear seat of a four door sedan. Interestingly enough, he was seated upon the floor thereof, with his legs extended beneath the front seat.

We figured that extricating him from the vehicle would facilitate assessment (eg, WTF was his primary malfunction, and what, if any, would be our role in addressing it?). Therefore we started to attempt to move his legs so that he could return to being seated upon the rear seat, and exit the vehicle from there. No joy.

It tuns out that highly intoxicated folks, like our friend here, were not so very good at listening to and following directions. Our entreaties that he fold one leg, and remove it from beneath the seat, seemed overly complex, as he did not successfully implement step one of our process.

So, we tried to move the seat forward, thinking that this would afford our patient enough maneuvering room so as to fold leg “A”, move it laterally, extend it, and repeat the process with leg “B”, and thereby achieve freedom.

Nope. As the seat moved, he shrieked as if we were removing the leg, likely anticipating reattachment on the sidewalk. So, that avenue of approach was foreclosed.

Doug and I consulted with the vehicle’s owner, who had been pacing about, intent that we not damage his baby. Or the patient, I suppose. Doug and I were fresh out of ideas, and figured that our friends in the firefighting division, with halligan bars, K-12 gasoline powered saws with metal cutting blades, hydraulic extrication tools, and similar toys for fun and games, likely could devise several new plans to remove this gentleman from the floor of the back seat.

I shared this thought with dispatch, noting that our patient appeared in no immediate life threat, and perhaps a “Code Three” (aka “Priority Three”, or no red lights no siren) response might be appropriate.

Dispatch acknowledged our request, told us that a squad would be on the way, and “Firefighters never respond ‘Code Three’, always ‘Code One’”.

Alrighty, then.

The vehicle owner overheard all this, and appeared to become considerably more excited. “You called the mother-f*@$ing firemen! They will f*@$ up my car!”

Doug and I agreed with him, that likely there would be some damage once the firefighters had extricated Mr. Drunk And Boneless from his car.

Mr. Drunk And Boneless thereupon became the recipient of a loud, profane, creative, and enthusiastic exhortation that he remove himself from the vehicle so as to greet the firefighters while sanding upon his own two feet, on the sidewalk, rather than seated upon the floor of the exhortor’s car. (Paraphrased). This was accompanied by pulling, pushing, tugging and bending, as the narrator demonstrated the contortions that he believed would facilitate the exit of the drunk and boneless fellow from the narrator’s vehicle.

And it came to pass that, once the squad had arrived on our scene, Mr. Drunk And Boneless was seated, relatively happily and nearly uninjured, upon somebody’s lawn, rather than enmeshed in the seat of the vehicle that had held him securely within it’s embrace.

The squad looked the scene over, returned to service, and our patient told us to bugger off, as he simply wanted to sleep.

Well, bye!

Fun And Games · Pains in my Fifth Point of Contact

BEFORE GOOGLE

Gather ’round, my children, and listen to a tale of long ago, and far away! In those far away, long ago times, there was electricity, yes, and telephones as well (although they were anchored to the walls of our homes, by “wires”). Why, indeed, we even had the Goddam Noisy Box, which you young ‘uns call “TV”.

Once upon a time, I was volunteering at a free clinic, serving as a nurse therein. The volunteer physician would interview, and examine the patient, and then provide orders for the treatment indicated. In those days, should one have symptoms of gonorrhea, the therapy was two injections of procaine penicillin g.

This turned out to be around 3 cc each, of a very, very viscous fluid, made particularly slow flowing because it was kept in the refrigerator.

At this point, I had been an RN for several years, working full time in ER. I had administered many, many, many injections intramuscularly as well as intravenously. I was familiar with injections, as well as strategies to mitigate patient discomfort while they were administered.

So, one gentleman was diagnosed with gonorrhea, and I received an order to administer two injections of 2.4 million units, each, of procaine penicillin g. I secured the medication, verified it’s outdate as well as the order, and made sure that the other medications the patient took, as well as his allergies, did not contraindicate this treatment.

I entered the room, and checked that the patient had been told of our plan of care. His reply? “Doc, doc, just shoot it on in!”

I informed him that he did NOT want me to “just shoot it on in”, and he would very much not enjoy the result of my doing so.

He reiterated his demand. I told him,” Sir? You are going to get two of these shots. You do not want me to simply ‘shoot it on in” because you will find it to be way, way more uncomfortable than it needs to be.”

Unmoved, he repeated his demand.

“Sir, how about I do as you insist, for the first injection. Then we can talk, and see if you would like to try it my way for your second shot, okay?”

He stated that he would not change his mind. I injected the first syringe of medication, rapidly, as he had insisted. It took some effort, because the penicillin was very thick, and did not want to flow through the needle at all rapidly.

My patient was very, very impressed by his first injection. Not at all favorably.

He stood up, once I had removed the needle, and commenced to hopping around and swearing. “Goddam! That really, really hurt! Shit, shit, shit! Doc, let me cool myself for a while!”

I corrected him. “Sir, I am an RN, not a physician. Once you calm yourself, you have another injection coming. Why don’t you allow me to administer it in the way that I know I ought to, and you can tell me how it is compared to the first one?”

He soon calmed himself, and I administered the second injection, steadily and slowly. The advantage of doing so correctly, oddly enough, is that the deliberate pace of administration allows the medication to spread out, rather than remaining a single, irritating ball of foreign material in the muscle, eliciting a cramp and muscle spasm. A cramp about which my patient had testified loudly.

Once I was done with the second injection, he stood, adjusted his clothing, and rubbed the second injection site. “Ya know, doc, that second one was not anywhere near as painful as the first one!”

Gooll-llee, Sergeant Carter! Just as if I had gone to school for this stuff, or something!

Fun And Games · guns · Having A Good Partner Is Very Important! · Life in Da City! · Pains in my Fifth Point of Contact

Retail Pharmacy, So To Speak

A long, long time ago, in an ER very far away, I was a night shift ER nurse.

Surprise!

So, TINS, TIWFDASL, well, uh, not so much. I and the other nurses were capitalizing upon a slow moment and gabbing away at the nursing station, when one of our security officers ran in (literally!) and announced that “We got a shooting in the driveway!”

Having heard no loud noises, I was puzzled, but, these officers were not prone to overstatement, so I asked a couple of the other nurses to grab a cart, I grabbed some gloves, and off we went to the ambulance entrance.

Now, by way of background, this was in the early days of the crack cocaine epidemic (although, how one contracted “crack cocaine” from another person without active, willful action on one’s own part is unclear to me). A couple of blocks away was what might be considered to be an open air drug market. Folks (commonly suburbanites) would drive up, engage a soul in conversation and arrange a transaction, another confederate would be summoned and the exchange would take place, money from the buyer, drugs from the vendor.

We were told that in this particular transaction, the named patient, seated in the back seat of this two door vehicle, appeared to believe that he was the designated quality control inspector. Indeed, the tale appeared to paint this fellow as believing that he ought to remonstrate with the vendor regarding the unsatisfactory nature of the product that had been delivered.

As the History Of Present Illness unraveled, the vendor did not seem to have fully committed to a “Zero Product Defect”, nor a “Every Customer Fully Satisfied, Every-time” merchandising philosophy, as, when the shootee indicated that he, the shootee, intended to enforce his product quality complaint by with holding payment, he, the vendor, is reported to have produced a handgun, and shot the shootee.

Bad times ensued. The driver, unsurprisingly, panicked, and sped away. A few blocks later, he, the driver, noticed our bright “Emergency” sign, and pulled in, bellowing an incomprehensible narrative.

So, security cleared the car of the terrorized goslings, and I (and security, and my nursing partners) tried to extricate Mr. Beenshot’s inert form out of the rear seat of a coupe, indeed, a compact coupe.

It only closely resembled a cluster fuck. For a while.

We maneuvered Mr. Beenshot into our code room, and commenced to resuscitating. Before things had progressed very far, our doc had determined that this guy had a “STAT!” transfer in his very near future, and so the nursing supervisor, who had come at a run upon our paging a Code Blue overhead, peeled off to arrange with our transfer ambulance service that they produce a crew and truck RFQ (Right F*%king Quick), and then phoned TBTCIDC to provide them a heads up.

We eventually got him stabilized (kind of, sort of), and the physician had a detailed chat with TBTCIDC senior physician. Off Mr. Beenshot went, and we sought out the entourage, intending to elicit more history, more circumstances leading up to the shooting, more pretty nearly anything, so we could provide that information to TBTCIDC, as well as, well, notify next of kin.

Alas, the posse had unassed our waiting room sometime while we were distracted, trying to save the life of their friend, I mean, co conspirator.

Duty · Fun And Games · Having A Good Partner Is Very Important! · Life in Da City! · Pains in my Fifth Point of Contact

Random Thoughts, Part V

Another day, fighting disease, and saving lives. Another opportunity to consider the fact that everybody brings sunshine into my life. Sometimes, that is when an individual enters my life…….

A long, long time ago, not so very far away, Doug and I had a run on a soul very much like our “O’BEAST!” friend. That reminded me that some folks have so much misery and unhappiness in their lives, that they have enough to share with everyone around them. Or, so they appear to think!

Regarding that: any particular miserable soul provides me the opportunity to be unhappy for a half hour, maybe an hour. On the other hand, they are wallowing in their sourness, unpleasantness, hour after hour, day and night, 24/7/365. Who is worse off?

Among THAT population, are folks who appear to lack an education in The Classics. This is manifested by their diction, their articulation, as well as their vocabulary. From time to time, “Back In The Day”, we in the ED would have one (or more) of these souls gracing us for an extended time, while their livers metabolized them towards freedom. (It takes a while to detox from a high level drunk!) Such a philosopher would feel compelled to share with us all his ruminations about Maternal-child relationships, and conjecture about our particular manifestation of those relationships. (generally running along Oedipal sorts of speculations) Along with thoughts about hygiene and the value to be found in regularity, and legitimacy of parentage (or something like that).

One physician characterized one individual’s declamations as reflecting a certain “Poverty of conversational themes”.

Fun And Games · Fun With Suits! · Pains in my Fifth Point of Contact · School Fun And Games

“Engendering Collectivity In Nursing”

So, TINS, TIWFDASL, and I had been admitted into the BHSU College of Nursing. I had moved on from Da City’s EMF (“The ‘Mergency Muthafuggers!”, as we had been so colorfully denominated on so many occasions), and was nursing in the ED of one of the nearly dozen small (at that time, around 300 beds) hospitals dotting Da City. I went from being chief steward of the union representing the medics, to a staff peon working nights.

Another of the nurses working with me was also pursuing her BSN, and so we study buddied up. We both had been old schooled in The Wisdom Of The Student, as so found ourselves in the rear 1/3 of this cavernous several hundred seat lecture hall, where the Blue Hive State University held it’s class on “Transitions in Nursing”. This was aimed at those of us entering the BSN program. The instructor of this particular class appeared enamored of Florence Nightingale, the Victorian English woman whose work caring for wounded and ill British soldiers in The Crimean War laid the foundation of contemporary Nursing.

This infatuation was reflected as this instructor read to us all from a book of Nightingale’s life. Amusingly, from time to time, she (the instructor) would hold the book above her head, turned towards us so that we could “see” some illustration or another, and detail the citation accompanying the illustration. (“Did you bring your binoculars?”)

From our seats, some 50 or more meters away, this was not as informative as our instructor appeared to consider it.

Once she had exhausted her store of Florence Nightingale trivia, she (the instructor, not Ms. Nightingale) moved on to instruct us in the advantages to be found in group efforts to improve the workplace. She described these efforts as “engendering collectivity” (and, do we not all wonder if, forty years later, in The Enlightened Twenty First Century, if the Thought Police would allow any of us to speak in those terms?), and appeared to believe that this was an unmitigated Good! Thing!.

Let me follow a tangent, if you please, for a brief intermission. I had mentioned that I had been a steward for the union representing Da City’s EMS. Interestingly, my father in his own youthful years, had had a hand in the formation of the American Newspaper Guild, which was a union for (surprisingly) newspaper folks.

So, I kinda grew up steeped in old school, Democrat political world view (think Scoop Jackson and Jack Kennedy, Not Occasio Cortez or Gavin Newsome), including the value to be found in an organized workplace. In that world view was the “real politik” perspective of the cost paid by the organizers initially struggling to create that organization. Examples such as The Fight Of The Overpass as the UAW attempted to unionize the Ford Motor Rouge Plant, or the Homestead Steel Strike, and other struggles as folks attempted to start, and foster, unions, including organizers being blackballed, being intimidated or outright assaulted.

So, as the instructor droned about “engendering collectivity in the workplace”, I eventually let my boyish enthusiasm overcome my naturally shy nature.

I raised my hand, was called upon, and stood. “Ma’am, I was a steward for the union representing EMS in Da City. My father helped organize the American Newspaper Guild. In the professional labor circles with which I am acquainted, we have a technical term for those who seek to engender collectivity in a previously unorganized workplace. That term, is ‘unemployed’.”

I sat down. Oddly enough, I was never again called upon, for the balance of that semester!

Fun And Games · Pains in my Fifth Point of Contact · Pre Planning Your Scene

Random Thoughts, Part IV

You may have heard of the ChicomFlu. It has been all over the news, and, evidently it is all Mr. Trump’s fault. Interestingly, the same folks voicing concerns about Mr. Trump being a fascist dictator, who is planning on a putsch in order to become President For Life, also are criticizing him for failing to seize control of the economy, and not dictating the minutiae of our lives in order to Halt! This! Scourge!. Apparently, that entire Federalism thing, and Tenth Amendment thing, bypassed these commentators in Government class.

Or else, our government schools failed them. Again.

So, in clinical medicine, in 2020, we now have drive in care. Care, that is, of a sort. So, folks drive up (remember that point), announce themselves (no clown’s mouth, thankfully!), and our registrar trots out and registers them. Our MA does preliminary interview, and obtains most of the vital signs (except BP). I then suit up in an impermeable gown, goggles, N-95 mask, with another lesser mask over top of it to prolong it’s service life, and gloves, and stroll out. I interview them through the vehicle window, examine ears, throat, auscultate heart sounds and breath sounds (and, by the way, I can tell you things about your engine and transmission). With this information, I form a diagnosis, formulate a plan of care, and instruct the patient in that plan.

I nearly always ask if my patient smokes. If the answer is affirmative, my response if “Stop doing that!” Occasionally, when the answer is “No”, I have indisputable olfactory evidence that this is an untruth. If I can smell your marijuana fumes through two masks, you are doing it wrong.

*History Lessons*

If you live in Bagwanistan, or Cuomo Valley
 New York, or, really anywhere, KNOW 
YOUR DAMNED MEDS!

It's commonly considered to be A GOOD
 THING if I avoid prescribing a medication
 that, in concert with whatever crap you
 take daily, will turn you into a flaming 
zombie, or cause your ears to drop off. So
 write that shit down someplace where 
you can find it. This appears to be a novel 
insight to a significant fraction of the
 population.
 

And, while you're at it, ask your pharmacist 
what you're allergic to, and WRITE THAT 
DOWN, as well. 

And, for those of you who are thinking
 that “All that is in my record!”, uh, well,
 if your records are in, say FREAKING
 FLORIDA, it might be a bit difficult for
 me to access. Particularly on 
weekends, or after 1800 hours their time.
 By the way, this also applies to folks
 whose records are in Milwaukee, and are
 visiting Flambeau Hospital, since that is
 the nearest healthcare to Copper State
 Park in BFE, Wisconsin.  Big City Hospital
 in Milwaukee may not see us as an 
entertainment subsidiary of their 
megalithic hospital system, and your info
may well be securely hidden away, 
from us. 

Jes' sayin. 
Fun And Games · Having A Good Partner Is Very Important! · Life in Da City! · Pains in my Fifth Point of Contact

The Fellow Who Would Not Go

A long, long time ago, in a Blue Hive not so very far from here (In truth, not nearly distant enough!), I was a nursing supervisor. This one time, TINS©, TIWFDASL©, and I received a phone call from one of my nursing floor charge nurses.

It developed that one of our physicians had written discharge orders for this one gentleman, let us refer to him as “Mr. Man”. Mr. Man was apparently of the opinion that our physician was mistaken, and that he, Mr. Man, was not sufficiently recovered to return to his home. I responded, spoke to the nurse, and then spoke to Mr. Man. He pretty much recreated the report that I had heard from the nurse, culminating in his ultimatum: “I’m not going anywhere, and you cannot make me!”

I phoned the physician and relayed my conversation. This doctor asked me a few questions, corroborating his assessment of the patient’s clinical circumstance. Having done so, he reiterated his plan of care: “Mr. Man does not meet the criteria from the insurance company, who is paying for his hospital stay, and they are not going to continue paying for his stay. He is discharged, I have written prescriptions, and arranged a post discharge office visit. If he has issues, we can discuss them at that visit.”

I relayed this to Mr. Man, and he again indicated his determination to remain. I returned to the nursing station, and invited my friend the security supervisor to show his smiling face, so that we could confer. My friend the security supervisor had no new input, although he sent a couple of officers to stand by the floor, in case Mr. Man decided that some interpretative dance, so to speak, would make his case more effectively.

Shortly, the med nurse was passing by, surprisingly enough, passing her afternoon meds. I stopped her. “Do you have any meds for Mr. Man?” She consulted he med book. “Yep, he has (whatever) due at 2 o’clock!”

“Hand it to me. I’ll take this one over from you.” I placed the meds securely in the med room, and returned to my chat with security. Sure enough, as I had expected, Mr. Man put on his call light, shortly after he noticed the med nurse pass by without stopping. I answered his light (security dawdled just down the hallway).

“Yes, Mr. Man, what can I do for you?”

“I am supposed to get (whatever) around this time. I just saw the nurse pass me by.”

“Why, yes you did, sir. You see, since the doctor has discharged you, you are no longer a patient here, you are now a visitor. It is not our practice to administer medications to visitors, and so the med nurse did not have any medications for you.”

“How am I supposed to get my meds?”

“Discharged patients usually obtain their medications from a pharmacy.”

“I bet you think you’re smart! You cannot make me leave! I’m staying right here!”

“Yes, sir, I understand what you are saying. Is there anything else?”

“No. Go away!”

With a smile, I departed. A couple of hours later, supper time arrived. I removed Mr. Man’s tray, and sent it back to dietary, with the admonition that he had received orders for discharge, a therefore would not require meal service. Indeed, shortly he noticed the aides passing supper trays, and, again, he engaged the call light. Again, I responded.

“Mr. Man, what can I do for you?”

“You could serve me my supper tray!”

“Oh, sir, I’m sorry! We do not feed visitors. You have been discharged, and therefore are present here as a visitor.”

“How am I supposed to get something to eat?”

“A lot of people find that a grocery store is helpful in this regard. Other folks find restaurants to be more to their liking.”

Again, I was dismissed.

In our facility at that time, visiting ended at 2000 hours. Our switchboard operator announced this fact, and bade all visitors a good evening. I popped my head into Mr. Man’s room, and reinforced this message. Security, this time in the person of the security supervisor, accompanied me.

“Sir, you will have to leave soon.”

“I dare you to throw me out!”

Security responded. “Sir, our usual practice is to ask folks to leave. Those who do not depart, are trespassing, and we ask Da City Police Department to handle that. I imagine the responding officers will ID such a person, run a LEIN check, and either walk that person out, or, if somebody were to have outstanding warrants, arrest that person, and lodge them in jail”

Mr. Man again indicated that our audience with him had come to a conclusion.

Outside the room, we heard one sided conversations as of telephone calls, and, from what we could discern, seeking transportation. Again, shortly, we were summoned by the call light. Mr. Security and I responded, and I (again) asked, “Mr. Man, what can I do for you?”

“I don’t have my prescriptions, and my ride will be here in a couple of minutes.”

“Yes, sir, I’ll get right on that!”

I secured his prescriptions and discharge instructions, and Mr. Security and I returned to the room, where I delivered the instructions and prescription, and then the security supervisor and I wheeled Mr. Man to the door, where he sprang from the wheelchair, entered a vehicle, and exited our lives. Whew!

Fun And Games · guns · Life in Da City!

“Doc, am I gonna die?”

 

So, TINS©, TIWFDASL©, and we caught a run for a shooting. Being full of excitement, because, gosh, THIS was an opportunity to, ya know, SAVE A LIFE!, we coded our happy way to the scene, there to meet the police. They pointed out the named patient, who, to our surprise, was NOT hovering at death’s door. Rather, he had sustained a small caliber gsw to his lower leg, had intact pulses downstream of his injury, and no evident bony injury. We walked him to the rig, buckled everybody in, and set out for TSBTCIDC.

We had dressed and bandaged his wound, and I was busily documenting same, along with the vitals we had obtained, when he asked me a question.

“Doc, am I gonna die?”

I looked at him, and shook my head no.

“Doc, really, am I gonna die?”

Sighing, I tucked my pen away, and addressed him. “No, you are not gonna die from this wound. You may not even be admitted to the hospital overnight.”

Hearing no further inquiry, I turned, again, to my charting. But, it was not to be.

“Doc, really, I can handle it. Am I gonna die?”

Some people, and one track minds. “Sir, you are not gonna die today, and not from that wound. Really, I’ve seen hundreds of shootings, and your injury is in no way life threatening. Okay?”

He nodded, as if in understanding. I (attempted to) return to my charting.

Shortly, he spake again. “Doc, really, I can handle it. Tell it to me straight, Doc. Am I gonna die?”

I was about over the “Doc” idiocy. “Sir, I’m not a physician, I’m a medic. And, do you really think you can handle the truth?”

“Yeah, I can handle it! Give it to me straight?”

“You sure you can handle the hard, icy, no bullshit truth? Because, if you are really, really sure, I’ll tell it to you straight! No punches pulled, no bullshit, no evasions. Is that really what you are looking for?”

“Yeah, Doc! Tell me the real deal!”

(Ah, well, it appeared that ‘listening to and following directions” was not at the very forefront of my friend’s skill set.) I rubbed my forehead, as if confronting some weighty ethical dilemma. I looked skyward, as if seeking Divine Guidance. I gazed at him, and delivered my response.

“Ok, if you’re sure you can handle it, here’s the real deal! You are not going to die! Do you know why, you are not going to die?”

“No, Doc, why?”

“Because you are not going to live that long!”

The rest of the trip was in blessed silence, as he endeavored to make sense of my revelation.

Fun And Games · Having A Good Partner Is Very Important! · Life in Da City!

Dumpster Diving

This one schedule, Doug had elected to rotate onto day shift. Likely something about a wife, family, and wanting to spend some time with That Bright Thing all up in the sky, while he was awake, might have figured into his calculations. In any event, TINS©, TIWFDASL© on night shift at Medic 14 (let us say). I was partnered up with Johnny Wadd (not his real name), who was, even among the collection of characters that made up the crews of EMS in those halcyon days, a character. He was book smart, street wise, quick on the uptake, head on a swivel, and, despite a very crusty persona, good hearted.

So, this one time, at band camp….uh, wrong story. So this one night we were cruising around between runs, and, as commonly happens in my “sea stories”, well, we caught a run. In the misty distance of all these years, I cannot tell you what the nominal nature of this run was. I do, however, remember (a) that the police were NOT dispatched to this run, and (b) once we arrived, and began to understand what the happs were, well, item “a” began to appear to be a big, big mistake.

So, we arrived on the scene to discover not a light on in the alleged address. Calling on the scene, we verified that the house number on the house before us, was, indeed, the address dispatch wanted us to report to. Check!

I knocked upon the door, while Johnny looked around the front of the house. As he reached the edge of the house adjoining the driveway, he heard something from the back that caught his attention. We meandered back to see what was up (notifying dispatch, on the way, of our explorations).

The sounds Johnny had heard were moans, and they were emanating from a wheeled trash bin. That made sense, as my flashlight illuminated two legs protruding from the top thereof. Johnny peered inside, and beheld a gentleman curled up inside, much the worse for wear.

We figured that any conversation to be had, would be had with greater clarity should our new friend be extricated from the trash bin, and so we began to attempt to lift him by his legs.

BAD PLAN! At least, in his view. He screamed, convincing us that this was NOT the course of action we desired to pursue. I ran to the truck, and retrieved the cot, a backboard, and backboard straps. Johnny and I then slowly levered the bin onto it’s side, and tried to gently place Mr. Trash Bin onto the backboard so as to remove him from his nest with minimal discomfort (to him) as we could manage. In his opinion, we were not particularly successful.

Once he was out in the light, such as it was (MagLite light, it was!), we could discern from the angulation of his thighs that he had sustained two fractured femurs. Further evaluation revealed a couple of gunshot wounds, as well as several stabbing wounds.

We determined that further time on the scene, with our basic life support asses, would be unprofitable, and so secured our guest onto the board, strapped him onto the cot, loaded him up into the truck, and coded our happy way to TBTCIDC.

Once we had turned him over to the ED crew, and they were poking, prodding, needling, radiating, IV-ing, and generally getting to know him far, far better than anyone else in his life ever had, we cleaned up and restocked the truck. Johnny turned to me, reflection written deeply in his eyes.

Ya know, Reltney, I wonder if someone, somehow, got a little angry at our guy there! Somebody does not seem to have had his very best interests in their heart!”